Stefano Lello

1

GYNECOLOGICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY

2020, VOL. 36, NO. 7, 567–568

https://doi.org/10.1080/09513590.2020.1779691

EDITORIAL

Is there still a role for SERMs in menopause management?

Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) are non-

hormonal compounds that can act as estrogen-agonist or antag-

onist according to the different target tissues. For instance, a

SERM may be an estrogen agonist on bone tissue and, con-

versely, a potent estrogen antagonist on breast tissue [1]. The

concept of SERM arises from the recognized existence of a spec-

trum of action from agonist-to-antagonist activity in nature. In

other words, the same hormone can exert an agonist or antagon-

ist function under different conditions in different cell types.

Estrogen receptors (ERs), and their signaling system, are import-

ant targets found in bone tissue, as clearly demonstrated by the

effects observed under aromatase inhibitors (AIs), on one hand,

and hormone therapy (HT), SERMs, and Tissue Selective

Estrogen Complex (TSEC), on the other hand.

As for SERMs, a well-known first-generation SERM is tamox-

ifene (TAM): it can be used in preventing breast cancer (BrCa)

in high-risk women and treating ER-positive BrCa patients, due

to its antiestrogenic action on mammary cells [2]. TAM also has

an agonist activity on bone tissue.

The most important SERMs currently available for the man-

agement of menopausal related disturbances are Raloxifene

(RLX), Bazedoxifene (BZA) – particularly useful for their action

on bone – and Ospemifene – indicated for vaginal health.

RLX (at a daily dose of 60 mg) is a second-generation non-

steroidal benzothiophene SERM that binds to ERs, reducing

bone resorption without stimulating the breast or the uterus.

RLX is able to increase vertebral and hip bone mineral density

(BMD) and decrease bone turnover markers (BTMs), thus sig-

nificantly reducing the relative risk of vertebral fracture [3], but

not that of non-vertebral fracture. Interestingly, due to its anties-

trogenic effect, the use of RLX in postmenopausal women is

associated with an important decrease of BrCa risk. More specif-

ically, after 4 years of follow-up, the incidence of BrCa (invasive

or non-invasive) with RLX was reduced by 62% compared to the

placebo (MORE Trial), and, after 8 years of RLX treatment, the

incidence of ER-positive BrCa was decreased by 76% [4].

Moreover, RLX resulted similar to TAM in reducing the risk of

invasive BrCa [5].

BZA (at a daily dose of 20 mg) is a third-generation SERM,

containing in its molecule an indolic-based core. BZA showed to

increase vertebral and hip BMD and reduce BTMs (e.g. osteocal-

cin, C-telopeptide and N-telopeptide) with significant differences

versus placebo [6]; additionally, BZA reduced vertebral fracture

risk in postmenopausal osteoporotic women [6]. Differently, in

comparison to RLX, BZA also reduces the risk of non-vertebral

fracture in a post-hoc analysis of high-risk patients. BZA shows

an antiestrogenic effect on breast tissue, but it is also character-

ized by a potent antiestrogenic effect at the endometrial level.

The endometrial antiestrogenic action of BZA was crucial in

the development of the so-called TSEC, in which BZA (20 mg) is

combined with conjugated equine estrogen (CEE: 0.45 mg).

TSEC is a progestin-free HT, that is effective for the treatment

of menopausal complaints and the prevention of osteoporosis,

without stimulating the breast or endometrium [7]. In particular,

TSEC improves hot flushes and quality of life of postmenopausal

women, and does not increase the risk of endometrial hyperpla-

sia, venous thromboembolism, stroke and coronary artery disease

for up to 2 years of administration [7]. Besides, TSEC does not

increase mammographic density (a marker of BrCa risk) or

breast tenderness and, nowadays, there is no evidence of an

increased risk of BrCa [7]. Overall, these data suggest that TSEC

can have a better breast-related safety profile than other trad-

itional HTs. In fact, in TSEC, the tissue-selectivity of action of a

SERM that replaces the progestin normally used in other HTs, is

a primary mechanism that counteracts the possible negative

effects of estrogens, and thus maintaining the benefits of a classic

HT.

Ospemifene (at a daily dose of 60 mg) is a SERM that can

improve vulvo-vaginal atrophy (VVA), ameliorate dyspareunia

[8], increase vaginal superficial cells and decrease vaginal pH,

without producing endometrial and breast stimulation.

Additionally, ospemifene has a neutral action on the cardiovas-

cular system. Overall, all these effects of ospemifene favor a sig-

nificant improvement of sexual function and quality of life of

postmenopausal women affected by VVA. Interestingly, ospemi-

fene can be also used to treat VVA in women with a previous

diagnosis of BrCa, after the completion of the active treatment

course (including adjuvant therapy).

In summary, several clinical gynecological conditions that

affect postmenopausal women may require the use of different

SERMs (alone or in association with estrogens) including: (a)

women with menopausal symptoms and/or at risk of osteopor-

osis (TSEC); (b) women with osteoporosis at high risk of BrCa

(RLX); (c) women suffering from VVA as the most bothersome

problem (ospemifene); and (d) women without menopausal

symptoms but at risk of osteoporosis (RLX, BZA).

In conclusion, SERMs are compounds with important tissue-

specific activities. The ability of a SERM to behave as an agonist

or an antagonist according to the target tissue provides an

important opportunity to individualize treatment strategies in

postmenopausal women through a wide range of options.

 

Disclosure statement

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the author(s).

 

ORCID

Stefano Lello   http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1616-9105

 

References

[1]   Nelson ER, Wardell SE, McDonnell DP, et al. The molecular mecha-

nisms underlying the pharmacological actions of estrogens, SERMs

and oxysterols: implications for the treatment and prevention of

osteoporosis. Bone. 2013;53(1):42–50.

[2]   Fisher B, Costantino JP, Wickerham DL, et al. Tamoxifen for preven-

tion of breast cancer: report of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast

and Bowel Project P-1 Study. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998;90(18):

1371–1388.

[3]     Ettinger B, Black DM, Mitlak BH, et al. Reduction of vertebral frac-

ture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with

raloxifene: results from a 3-year randomized clinical trial. Multiple

Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation (MORE) Investigators. JAMA.

1999;282(7):637–645.

[4]     Martino S, Cauley JA, Barrett-Connor E, et al. Continuing outcomes

relevant to Evista: breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal osteo-

porotic women in a randomized trial of raloxifene. J Natl Cancer

Inst. 2004;96(23):1751–1761.

[5]     Vogel VG, Costantino JP, Wickerham DL, et al. Effects of tamoxifen

vs raloxifene on the risk of developing invasive breast cancer and

other disease outcomes: the NSABP Study of Tamoxifen and

Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 trial. JAMA. 2006;295(23):2727–2741.

[6]     Silverman SL, Christiansen C, Genant HK, et al. Efficacy of bazedoxi-

fene in reducing new vertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal

women with osteoporosis: results from a 3-year, randomized, pla-

cebo-, and active-controlled clinical trial. J Bone Miner Res. 2008;

23(12):1923–1934.

[7]   Lello S, Capozzi A, Scambia G. The tissue-selective estrogen complex

(bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens) for the treatment of menopause.

Int J Endocrinol. 2017;2017:5064725.

[8]   Archer DF, Carr BR, Pinkerton JV, et al. Effects of ospemifene on

the female reproductive and urinary tracts: translation from preclin-

ical models into clinical evidence. Menopause. 2015;22(7):786–796.

 

Stefano Lello   Anna Capozzi and Giovanni Scambia

Department of Woman and Child Health, Policlinico Gemelli

Foundation-IRCCS, Rome, Italy

lello.stefano@gmail.com

 

Received 2 June 2020; accepted 4 June 2020

ß 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

La Salute della Donna in Premenopausa, Postmenopausa e Terza età: condividere aspetti scientifici ed esperienze cliniche tra Medici ed Operatori Sanitari nell'interesse della Paziente

Position: 
Segretario